Conformity - Your data, your rules
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LitSavant Conformity Engine - Features

The LitSavant Conformity Engine operates by allowing users to create Logics.  A Logic is equivalent to an event handler in that it evaluates a set of tests and then performs actions based on the result of those tests.  Each logic is associated with one or more layouts and contains one or more Conditions which the application evaluates.  Each Logic is also associated with one or more Result Processes - these are actions for the application to undertake and can be set to run when the Conditions evaluate as either true or false.

The key features of the application are

  • Configuration of event handler like functionality from within Relativity using standard Relativity interface
  • Securable using the standard Relativity security model
  • Instant activation and inactivation of individual Logics
  • Ability to modify individual Logics as and when required
  • Ability to define and reuse Conditions which are stored within a Conditions library
  • Conditions can reference any custom object as well as the document object
  • Result Processes can be configured with custom messages

Current functionality allows for three basic Result process types.  More are planned.  The current supported Result Process types are:

  • Send a message to the user onscreen
  • Send an email to a designated user
  • Write data to a field
EDRM
Electronic Discovery Reference Model: one of a number of industry initiatives to provide a common framework of terminology to describe the entire document lifecycle in the context of litigation.
Discoverable
Prior to the CPR the test under the rules was that any document "relating to any matter in question" was discoverable. The courts took a very wide view of what was covered by this. The test was laid down a long time ago when no-one had the quantities of paper they have now ...
Lord Justice Jacob (19 Jul 2007)

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Discoverable

Prior to the CPR the test under the rules was that any document "relating to any matter in question" was discoverable. The courts took a very wide view of what was covered by this. The test was laid down a long time ago when no-one had the quantities of paper they have now…

…What is now required is that, following only a "reasonable search" (CPR 31.7(1)), the disclosing party should, before making disclosure, consider each document to see whether it adversely affects his own or another party's case or supports another party's case. It is wrong just to disclose a mass of background documents which do not really take the case one way or another. And there is a real vice in doing so: it compels the mass reading by the lawyers on the other side, and is followed usually by the importation of the documents into the whole case thereafter - hence trial bundles most of which are never looked at.

Lord Justice Jacob (19 Jul 2007)
Nichia Corp v Argos Ltd [2007] EWCA Civ 741 (19 July 2007).

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