LitSavant Ltd - Thinking outside the box ...
Millennium Bridge, London, UK

Litigation Support Services

For law firms with offices in the UK, we can provide the services of a litigation support manager on a contract basis - to cope with a particularly large matter or to cover maternity leave for example.

Typically the work done by a litigation support manager might involve:

  • liaising with the client's IT team to identify, preserve and collect documents for disclosure
  • formulating a defensible strategy so as to minimise the amount of data that needs to be collected
  • identifying further culling strategies (such as keyword searching) to identify within the collected data those documents which require review
  • identifying suitable technologies and service providers to assist in the collection, culling and review process
  • training your legal team how to get the best out of the technology that you are using
  • designing quality control processes to monitor and confirm the accuracy of the review
  • coordinating the disclosure process
  • maintaining such audit logs as are required to ensure that the entire process stands up to scrutiny

For firms without an office inside the UK we offer the services of an independent consultant on the ground with extensive knowledge of the London market for litigation support services. In addition to the services outlined above, we can also:

  • assist with the selection and coordination of UK vendors in the collection, processing, review and production phases of your project
  • identify some of the constraints on moving data into and out of the jurisdiction (such as the Data Protection Act)
ESI
Electronically Stored Information: this is an all inclusive term referring to conventional electronic documents, the contents of databases, mobile phone messages, digital recordings and transcripts of instant messages.
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ESI

Electronically Stored Information: this is an all inclusive term referring to conventional electronic documents (e.g. spreadsheets and word processing documents) and in addition the contents of databases, mobile phone messages, digital recordings (e.g. of voicemail) and transcripts of instant messages.  All of this material needs to be considered for disclosure.

Discoverable
Prior to the CPR the test under the rules was that any document "relating to any matter in question" was discoverable. The courts took a very wide view of what was covered by this. The test was laid down a long time ago when no-one had the quantities of paper they have now ...
Lord Justice Jacob (19 Jul 2007)

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Discoverable

Prior to the CPR the test under the rules was that any document "relating to any matter in question" was discoverable. The courts took a very wide view of what was covered by this. The test was laid down a long time ago when no-one had the quantities of paper they have now…

…What is now required is that, following only a "reasonable search" (CPR 31.7(1)), the disclosing party should, before making disclosure, consider each document to see whether it adversely affects his own or another party's case or supports another party's case. It is wrong just to disclose a mass of background documents which do not really take the case one way or another. And there is a real vice in doing so: it compels the mass reading by the lawyers on the other side, and is followed usually by the importation of the documents into the whole case thereafter - hence trial bundles most of which are never looked at.

Lord Justice Jacob (19 Jul 2007)
Nichia Corp v Argos Ltd [2007] EWCA Civ 741 (19 July 2007).

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