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Terms and Conditions of use

Please read these terms and conditions carefully before using this website. By accessing and using this site you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions set out below. We reserve the right to revise these terms and conditions at any time by displaying the amended terms and conditions on this website. If you use the site after any amendment to the terms and conditions you will be deemed to have agreed to them.

1. Site Ownership

LITSAVANT LTD and its licensors are the owners of the material on this website. The information and materials on this site are provided for general purposes and so that you can find out more about us and the services that we offer. No warranty express or implied is given as to its accuracy or completeness nor does it constitute legal or professional advice. Any reliance on any such information or materials is solely at your own risk, and we exclude any liability for loss arising out of access to or use of or reliance on any information posted on or downloaded from this site. Information from this site may be copied provided that the source is acknowledged clearly.

2. Your use of this website

You will not use this website for any unlawful purpose including, without limitation, posting inaccurate, or false information about yourself or others or, posting material containing any virus or interfering with the operation of this website or attempting to decipher, or modify any of the software, coding or information comprised in this website.

3. Links

Where we provide hypertext links to other websites we do so for information purposes only. Use of such links is entirely at your own risk. LITSAVANT LTD accepts no liability or responsibility for any loss which may arise from reliance on the contents of any site to which a hypertext link exists.

4. Copyright

All rights including copyright and database rights in this site and its contents are owned (or licensed) to us or otherwise used by us as permitted by law. You may access the contents of the site only for your own private or internal use within your organisation, but not for any commercial or public use.

5. Governing Law

These terms and conditions and your use of this site are governed by English Law. Disputes arising out of these terms and conditions shall be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts

EDD / Processing
Electronic Document Disclosure/Discovery: the process of preparing electronic documents for loading into a Litigation Support System.
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EDD / Processing

Electronic Document Disclosure/Discovery: the process of preparing electronic documents for loading into a Litigation Support System.  This involves extracting individual emails from mailboxes, unzipping zip and other archive files and extracting the metadata from them.  Metadata is often then inserted into a Load File to allow the data to be input into a litigation support system

"any matter in question"
We desire to make the rule as large as we can with due regard to propriety; and therefore I desire to give as large an interpretation as I can to the words of the rule, "a document relating to any matter in question in the action." ...
Lord Justice Brett (20 Dec 1882)

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"any matter in question"

We desire to make the rule as large as we can with due regard to propriety; and therefore I desire to give as large an interpretation as I can to the words of the rule, "a document relating to any matter in question in the action." I think it obvious from the use of these terms that the documents to be produced are not confined to those, which would be evidence either to prove or to disprove any matter in question in the action;

It seems to me that every document relates to the matters in question in the action, which not only would be evidence upon any issue, but also which, it is reasonable to suppose, contains information which may--not which must--either directly or indirectly enable the party requiring the affidavit either to advance his own case or to damage the case of his adversary. I have put in the words "either directly or indirectly," because, as it seems to me, a document can properly be said to contain information which may enable the party requiring the affidavit either to advance his own case or to damage the case of his adversary, if it is a document which may fairly lead him to a train of inquiry, which may have either of these two consequences.

Lord Justice Brett (20 Dec 1882)
The Compagnie Financiere et Commerciale du Pacifique v The Peruvian Guano Company (1882) 11 QBD 55 (1882) [IN THE COURT OF APPEAL.] 1882 Dec. 20

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