Conformity - Your data, your rules
LitSavant Ltd - Thinking outside the box ...

LitSavant Conformity Engine - Overview

The LitSavant Conformity Engine is a Relativity® application which enables any authorised user to design and implement rules which can then be applied to the data entry process.  These rules may be used to generate real time alerts, to restrict incompatible data from being entered or to code additional properties against the active record.

The innovation in this application is that it puts control of the process of designing (and turning on) the data entry rules into the hands of a standard Relativity user.  Relatiivity's standard interface is used to enter the rules and no programming knowledge is required.

Up until now, the sort of functionality that the LitSavant Conformity Engine provides could only be done by one or more event handlers.  Event handlers are pieces of code that are usually commissioned for a speciic project or purpose, written by a programmer, compiled, tested and then implemented within a Relativity environment and workspace.  Event handlers of this kind may require updating when the underlying Relativity instance is upgraded and will usually need to be completely revisited if there is a need to tweak the way they operate.

Against this background we developed the LitSavant Conformity Engine to replace the need for event handlers for all but the most complex of tasks.  We wanted to be sure that it would be easy to design and refine the rules to be applied - in short we wanted you to be able to apply your rules to your data!!

CPR
Civil Procedure Rules: the ground rules under which litigation is conducted in the UK.
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CPR

Civil Procedure Rules: the ground rules under which litigation is conducted in the UK.  CPR 31 is of particular importance since this is the rule governing the disclosure process.  They can be found here.

Discoverable
Prior to the CPR the test under the rules was that any document "relating to any matter in question" was discoverable. The courts took a very wide view of what was covered by this. The test was laid down a long time ago when no-one had the quantities of paper they have now ...
Lord Justice Jacob (19 Jul 2007)

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Discoverable

Prior to the CPR the test under the rules was that any document "relating to any matter in question" was discoverable. The courts took a very wide view of what was covered by this. The test was laid down a long time ago when no-one had the quantities of paper they have now…

…What is now required is that, following only a "reasonable search" (CPR 31.7(1)), the disclosing party should, before making disclosure, consider each document to see whether it adversely affects his own or another party's case or supports another party's case. It is wrong just to disclose a mass of background documents which do not really take the case one way or another. And there is a real vice in doing so: it compels the mass reading by the lawyers on the other side, and is followed usually by the importation of the documents into the whole case thereafter - hence trial bundles most of which are never looked at.

Lord Justice Jacob (19 Jul 2007)
Nichia Corp v Argos Ltd [2007] EWCA Civ 741 (19 July 2007).

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